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Civil Service

Did you know that cancer is classed as a disability under the Equality Act?

Sadly in the UK, one in two people will be diagnosed with cancer in their lifetime, and around 1 million people of working age, currently have cancer. Given the significant number of people affected (including many thousands of carers and …

Civil Service Year of Inclusion: What inclusion means to me...Rohini Aggarwal

To me, inclusion means being seen for the skilled Civil Servant I am. It means not being reduced to the colour of my skin, my gender, or the combination of both. For this blog, I have been asked to focus …

Disability History Month 2020: Influencing Change in the Civil Service for 21 Years

Posted by: , Posted on: - Categories: Better policymaking, Diversity and inclusion, Health and wellbeing, Improved outcomes

The Civil Service Disability Network has been around for 21 years now. Our remit is to champion disability, remove barriers and influence change. I guess all those years ago, we didn’t think that it would still matter today as much …

Civil Service Year of Inclusion: what inclusion means to me... Cheryl Avery

Posted by: , Posted on: - Categories: Diversity and inclusion, Good management, Our Civil Service

Hi, my name is Cheryl Avery, and this is what inclusion means to me…. The dictionary defines inclusion as “the practice or policy of including people who might otherwise be excluded or marginalised, such as those who have physical or …

Personal Disability Stories – living with change: David’s story

Deputy Civil Service Disability Champion Ben Merrick introduces David, who talks about living with change as a person with a disability.

International Day Against Homophobia, Biphobia and Transphobia

Posted by: , Posted on: - Categories: Civil Service Leaders, Diversity and inclusion, Year of Inclusion

Marking International Day Against Homophobia, Biphobia and Transphobia, Civil Service LGB&TI Champion Jonathan Slater explains why, in the context of the coronavirus pandemic, it is particularly important to think about the impact of prejudice on LGB&TI colleagues at home and in their communities.